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Lesson 16: The Best Attract the Best by Brad Brewer

May 12, 2014 4:10 pm

Still three feet off the ground thanks to my weekend traversing pristine Augusta National during The Masters and observing the best players in the world attracting the very best audience in sport, is a perfect example of the next lesson I share with you entitled: The Best Attract the Best. No matter what your current ability level, I am confident this lesson from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer’s Success Lessons for Golf, Business and Life will inspire you to pursue like minded people to achieve your goals on and off the course.

Lesson 16
The Best Attract the Best

Michael Jordan has been retired from the NBA since 2003, but he’s still considered one of the most recognizable and admired professional athletes in world history. He continues to appear in commercials and films, and, while the famous Gatorade slogan of the 1990s, “I wanna be like Mike,” may no longer be in circulation, its premise still holds true. Kids still want to play basketball with the prowess and skill of Michael Jordan, captured in the lyrics of the Gatorade jingle, “Sometimes I dream he is me.” For decades, kids of all ages have been drawn to this living basketball legend.

In 1992, Michael Jordan came to Orlando for the NBA All-Star Games. And what does a globe-trotting sports icon do before a big game? If he’s in the Orlando area and loves the game of golf as much as MJ, he plays at the Bay Hill Club & Lodge. But Jordan didn’t just come to play golf?—?he came to play marathon golf. We’re talking fifty-four holes in one day!

On this particular day, I was honored to host him and join the foursome with a friend of Michael’s and a student of mine, Robert Damron. Robert had just begun his college golf career and was already named a freshman All-American at the University of Central Florida. At the time of this writing, he was in his fifteenth season on the PGA Tour and a multi-winner. Needless to say, it was a very good thing having him as my partner for the day. (Discretion prevents me from revealing the results of the day’s event!)

A Special Request from the King of Basketball

At the end of a fun fifty-four holes, we were cooling down from the heat of the day and visiting in the clubhouse. Michael leaned forward. “You know, Brad, I would do anything to have the opportunity to play golf with Arnold Palmer. He could tell me when and where .?.?. and I’m there! He’s one of my all-time heroes. Even though he was close to the end of his competitive career when I was old enough to remember, I have watched most of the Shell’s Wonderful World of Golf?? competitions on the Golf Channel. I just loved his fearless and aggressive style as a competitor.”

Frankly, I was taken aback. The greatest basketball player of all time was talking to me like a schoolboy about his desire to hang with the “King of golf,” Arnold Palmer. Still serving in the capacity of host, I told Jordan that I was sure Mr. Palmer would be pleased to hear of his request and I promised to talk with him about it the next morning. Believe it or not, Jordan departed for the game at the Orlando Arena (after fifty-four holes of golf!), where he scored 18 points in a 153?–?113 thumping from the Western All-Stars. I wonder if MJ overdid it with the golf.

I kept my promise. As I was passing through the grill room the next morning, I spotted Mr. Palmer sitting at his usual breakfast table, reading that morning’s Orlando Sentinel. The front-page headlines were about Magic Johnson being awarded MVP of the previous evening’s All-Star Game?—?Magic’s first game since announcing his retirement.

“Did you get a chance to watch that game last night?” I asked him. He said he had and he asked if I knew Michael Jordan had played golf at Bay Hill yesterday.
I chuckled. “I know!” I told him. “I was in his foursome with young Robert Damron. In fact, Jordan had a request for you.”
Mr. Palmer put down his paper, intrigued.
“He wanted me to relay his gratitude for hosting him and said, ‘Please tell Mr. Palmer that I would meet him anywhere, anytime?—?except during the final game of the playoffs?—?to play golf with him. He is one of my heroes and I would really like to have a chance to play a round with the King.’?”
Arnold laughed heartily, a pleased grin sweeping across his face. “He said that?”

A Meeting Fit for Kings

Arnie and Michael finally met and played at a Pro-Am Seniors Tournament at the Stonebridge Country Club in Illinois. How did they square off? Jordan, playing to an “eight” handicap, shot an estimated 36-45-81. The King started slowly, but he shot a 37-36-73?—?just one over par. What was Arnie’s assessment of Jordan’s golf game? “Michael swings the club very well and has a lot of potential,” he said. “I was pleasantly surprised the way he goes after a golf ball. I enjoyed the game.”

I have in my library a little black book that I picked up at an airport and read in its entirety on a twenty-five-minute flight from Las Vegas to Rancho Cucamonga. The book is titled I Can’t Accept Not Trying, with my favorite chapter being “Fear Is an Illusion.” The author? Michael Jordan. I suggest that you add this book to your collection. Here is a brief excerpt:
Sometimes failure actually just gets you closer to where you want to be. If I’m trying to fix a car, every time I try something that doesn’t work, I’m getting closer to finding the answer. The greatest inventions in the world had hundreds of failures before the answers were found. I think fear sometimes comes from a lack of focus or concentration, especially in sports. If I had stood at the free throw line and thought about 10 million people watching me on the other side of the camera lens, I couldn’t have made anything. So I mentally tried to put myself in a familiar place.

I thought about all those times I shot free throws in practice and went through the same motion, the same technique that I had used thousands of times. You forget about the outcome. You know you are doing the right things. So you relax and perform. After that, you can’t control anything anyway. It’s out of your hands, so don’t worry about it.

It’s no different than making a presentation in the business world or doing a report for school. If you did all the things necessary, then it’s out of your hands. Either the clients liked the presentation or they didn’t. It’s up to the client, the buyer, or the teacher. I can accept failure. Everyone fails at something. But I can’t accept not trying. That’s why I wasn’t afraid to try baseball. I can’t say, “Well, I can’t do it because I’m afraid I may not make the team.” That’s not good enough for me. It doesn’t matter if you win as long as you give everything in your heart and work at it 110 percent.

Success is something you attract by the person you become.
Jim Rohn, Motivational speaker and author

Arnold Palmer and Michael Jordan share a common perspective. From a competitive standpoint, these two spirits are one and the same. The fast friendship between the two is but one example that the best truly do attract the best. As the turn-of-the-century author Wallace Wattles wrote so eloquently, “To fix your attention on the best is to surround yourself with the best and to become the best.”

For over fifty years, Arnold Palmer has made a habit of doing just that.

The 2014 High Performance Junior Camp season is right around the corner and the tone of the training experience is in sync with what Wattle’s so eloquently said, “to fix each player’s focus on developing the habits of the very best while surrounded by like minded players”. Creating this “Hotbed” of talent inspires learning and growth at an accelerated rate of improvement within a short window of opportunity. It takes place in the shadow of the Convention Center at Rosen Shingle Creek, hosting high powered meetings and conferences every week. Why do these Fortune 500 Companies invest so much time and money traveling to be together when today we can share ideas and communicate instantly and less expensively with social media and online training tools? Because the vibration and energy produced during the gathering of like minded people is the breeding ground for a culture that elicits higher human performance.

Seeking juniors who desire to train with like minded athletes this summer! Call us direct, 407.996.3306, email, contact@bradbrewer.com or by cell, 407.595.3645, and visit www.bradbrewer.com/academy-programs/summer-junior-programs/ for details and enrollment forms.

Until next time, happy golfing,

Lesson 10: You Get What You Give by Brad Brewer

April 9, 2014 8:00 pm

“Masters Month” has many of you dusting off your clubs and venturing out to the range or golf course for the first time in several months. How will you practice this spring to positively grow your game? No matter what your current ability level, I am confident this lesson from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer’s Success Lessons for Golf, Business and Life will inspire you to want more from your game.

Lesson 10

You Get Out of It What You Put Into It

Back when I was the director of the Arnold Palmer Golf Academy based out of the Bay Hill Club in Orlando, my days began at 7:00 a.m., Monday through Saturday. The school opened promptly at 8:00 a.m., and I can still remember how one new freshman mini-tour player would be the first young professional on the practice range by early morning light and always one of the last to leave at dusk. That player was someone who would become my good friend and a PGA Tour winner, Dicky Pride.

Dicky’s work ethic was well beyond that of any of the other mini-tour players preparing to go to Tour School in the fall. I also noticed he possessed a strong self-confidence and a willingness to talk openly and candidly about his abilities. Some of the other players didn’t like his attitude. They considered him to be cocky, not confident. Frankly, I was always a bit amused at his strong ego. I thought it showed a great degree of determination, and though his game may not have yet caught up to his mouth, he was declaring exactly what he wanted to accomplish. I admired that about him. He certainly had learned the positive mindset of the PGA champions who were playing out of Bay Hill at that time. Swinging alongside him were greats such as Payne Stewart, Scott Hoch, Greg Norman, Corey Pavin, Mark O’Meara, Ian Baker-Finch, and Brad Faxon, to name just a few.

With every deed you are sowing a seed, though the harvest you may not see.

Ella Wheeler Wilcox

In my honest opinion, Dicky wasn’t the best player to ever show up at Bay Hill with the aspirations of playing on the PGA Tour. In fact, in the summer of 1992, Bay Hill was swimming with young aspiring talent preparing for Tour School in the fall. At that time, Dicky was realistically about the eighth or ninth best player in that group of professionals and amateurs.

Since college, one of Dicky’s coaches has been the world-renowned sports psychologist Bob Rotella. Preparing Dicky for Qualifying School, Rotella had given him a bit of advice similar to that which I had given to Bradley Hughes. It worked for Dickey just as it had for Bradley. (Dicky told me it gave him a boost of confidence and led to quick success on the Tour.) Rotella told him, “Q-school is going to be a little easier than playing the Tommy Armour Tour has been for you because not so many players really believe they can do well at the Tour Qualifying.”

Well, that just fired up Dicky’s already confident attitude and gave him an extra kick at just the right time. Pride and seven other Bay Hill junior members headed to the grinding test known as the PGA Tour Qualifying School that fall of 1992. Only two made it through with full exempt cards: Robert Damron and Dicky Pride. Everyone at the club was anticipating Robert’s success. He had proven himself in the National Amateur events and mini-tours since turning professional. But nobody was expecting such a stellar performance from Mr. Pride—except Dicky.

I’ve asked the then forty-one-year-old Tuscaloosa native to share a story about his first meeting with our mutual friend, Arnold Palmer. According to Dicky, the meeting he writes about turned out to be one of those life-changing conversations that came at just the right time. To this day he remains amazed how a casual and offhand conversation came to inspire him to remarkable success on the PGA Tour.

A Turning Point

Dicky Pride

As I watched Arnold Palmer come off the steps of the pro shop, my mind and heart began to race. How would I address him? What would I say? I knew I was overthinking things, but how do you properly and respectfully address a legend?

I decided to be straightforward and direct. Greeting him on the putting green, I walked up, stuck out my hand, and said simply, “Mr. Palmer, Dicky Pride. I just wanted to thank you very much for allowing me to become a junior member. I really appreciate the opportunity.”

Mr. Palmer, ever the gentleman, even though he had likely heard a variation of that comment hundreds of times, was polite and gracious. “Oh, good, good,” he replied with a smile. “Now, Dicky, you’re going to try to turn pro, aren’t you?”

“Yes, sir,” I replied. “I’m about to turn pro, and try to play … see what I can do.”

Mr. Palmer paused, placed one hand on his hip and the other on his club. “Well, do you mind if I give you some advice?”

Here was one of my dad’s idols and the “King of golf” himself, and he wanted to give me some advice? I was sweating bullets. “Oh, yes, sir, please do!” I replied eagerly.

“You know, Dicky,” he began, “when you are on tour—” He stopped suddenly, clearly aware that I was hanging on every word. He cocked his head, a sign, I later learned, that he was deadly serious.

“There are no miracles in this game of golf. You only get out of it what you put into it.”

With that bit of advice, we immediately connected. It was the same no-nonsense wisdom that my father taught me about working hard and giving my full energy toward what I wanted to achieve.

Parting ways, I can remember spinning on my heels and releasing the air that was trapped in my lungs. I immediately ran into the pro shop. Throwing myself onto the counter, I hollered to nobody in particular, “I need a sheet of paper and pen!” The three assistant pros behind the counter gave me puzzled looks.

“Excuse me?” one asked quizzically.

I repeated myself a bit more slowly. “I need a sheet of paper and a pen. I’ve got to write something down!”

I still have that “Palmerism” scribbled on that paper in my office for daily viewing:

“There are no miracles in this game of golf. You only get out of it what you put into it.”

For the last eighteen years, those simple words have helped to frame my pursuit of professional golf. I’ve begun every day with one goal: try to improve my game from yesterday. I may not always make it, but I’m going to give it a shot.

Dicky’s story is a great testimonial to the benefits of working toward your goal on a daily basis, for within two years of that first conversation with Arnie, Dicky went on to win the Federal Express St. Jude Classic. He has since had more than a dozen top-ten finishes in PGA Tour events with over $3 million in career earnings.

In order to get something significant out of life, we must put something of significance into our life. To enjoy more fairways, greens and one-putts in May, means doing the good work in April.

Enjoy “Spring Training” with us in Orlando and get a huge jump start on a great summer of golf. Call direct, 407.996.3306, email, contact@bradbrewer.com or by cell, 407.595.3645.

Until next time, happy golfing,

Lesson 4: Simplify the Complex ~Brad Brewer, Top 100 Teacher

March 14, 2014 4:13 pm

Spring temperatures are here in Orlando and the anticipation of this year’s Arnold Palmer Invitational, just days away, always creates a fun buzz in the air. It’s time to prepare for your best summer of golf and it need not include any “March Madness”. My intention by sharing this next lesson from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer’s Success Lessons for Golf, Business and Life is to inspire you to just keep it simple.

Lesson 4
Simplify the Complex

Should you ever cross paths with any of my students from the past twenty years, they will undoubtedly remember my recitation of a favorite Arnold Palmer quote:

Golf is deceptively simple and endlessly complicated. A child can play it well and a grown man can never master it. Any single round of it is full of unexpected triumphs and perfect shots that end in disaster. It is almost a science, yet it is a puzzle without an answer. It is gratifying and tantalizing, precise and unpredictable; it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. It satisfies the soul and frustrates the intellect. It is at the same time rewarding and maddening–and it is without doubt the greatest game mankind has ever invented.

That brilliantly sums up everything that the great and beautiful game of golf is and can be. I’ve thought about these words for years, and I’ve arrived at a simple conclusion: I’m drawn to Mr. Palmer’s perspective for no other reason than this—he is right!

Back-to-the-Basics Simplicity

Given how foundational Palmer’s philosophy of simplifying complexity has been to me, I’ve naturally been curious about how and where it originated. During a visit to his Latrobe office, I decided to ask.

“What has helped you keep your thoughts so deceptively simple about such complex things?” I asked. Arnold leaned back in his chair, rubbed his chin, and gazed out the window, his eyes brightening, his gaze settling on the distant course. “It was the way my father and mother raised me,” he began. “My dad taught me how to play, and he would keep it to the basic fundamentals, like a good grip, steady head, and the need to just hit it hard! That was fun for me, and it gave me great satisfaction to strike the ball this way when I was a young man. As I progressed during my career, if I ever felt like I was out of sorts, I would just go back to these simple thoughts, and I would find that ‘solid ball-striking’ that leads to winning golf tournaments again. “But I have seen many fellow competitors get twisted into knots,” he continued, “trying new things and searching for that magical swing, though to no avail. In fact, some unfortunate fellows just over-thought themselves right off the Tour and out of competitive golf. I tried to keep all of my energy focused on my goal of winning every tournament that I entered. My thought was to create and execute good shots, one at a time. Not perfect swings, but keeping it simple with basic fundamentals that produced the good golf shots that proved to serve me well.”

Breaking Bad Habits
As a pro whose responsibility it is to “fix” the broken swings of my students, I find Palmer’s “swing thoughts” refreshingly (though deceptively) simple. Mere mortals like us might easily discount them. After all, unlike Arnold Palmer or Tiger Woods or Annika Sorenstam, many of us didn’t begin playing golf as a young boy or girl, or benefit from a parent or coach instilling good golfing habits back then. There’s a tremendous advantage in learning these simple lessons at a young age, before faulty habits set in and negative thoughts become the norm. Fortunately, just because you didn’t begin playing at age six doesn’t mean that you can’t reprogram your habits toward achieving what you want to accomplish.

If you’ve only picked up the game as an adult, take heart. The vast majority of players out there have done the very same thing. Elevating your game begins with awareness that certain fundamentals are necessary to develop a repeatable shot pattern. This newly practiced paradigm will require conscious thought for a while, with several repetitions, before it becomes your newly formed habit. What I’m suggesting is nothing new, of course, but a return to the basic fundamentals of the game can be one of the most important things a golfer can do.

The secret of getting ahead is getting started. The secret of getting started is breaking your complex overwhelming tasks into small manageable tasks, and then starting on the first one. ~Mark Twain

How long does it take to develop good golfing habits? Of course, every individual is unique, but scientists have studied the length of time the average person needs to reach a level of what they call “automaticity” for a particular skill, referring to the ability to do something without having to force it or struggle to break an old habit. (You might hear someone say they “don’t even have to think” about what they’re doing, but that’s rarely the case in sports. Show me a golfer who doesn’t think about his shots, and I’ll show you a golfer who spends most of his time looking for errant balls.) Researchers have discovered that when it comes to forming a new habit, the length of time needed ranges from 18 to 254 days, but the average person takes approximately 66 days. That might seem like a long time, but it’s less than a summer, and, given that we’re emphasizing simplicity, I’ve discovered that my average student can usually break faulty habits and form new ones in only a couple of weeks. Personally, I would strongly suggest finding a good certified LPGA or PGA teaching professional who can help you define your basics, simplify your thoughts, and have more fun.

At the root of Arnold Palmer’s advocacy for simplicity is the fact that he’s also well grounded in the moment. Despite his credentials in the Hall of Fame, he still remembers what it’s like to be starting out in the game, and he understands that if you’re going to do anything complicated well for a long period of time, you have to keep it simple, a paradox he is more philosophical about than most golfers. “One of the most fascinating things about golf,” he has said, “is how it reflects the cycle of life. No matter what you shoot, the next day you have to go back to the first tee and begin all over again and make yourself into something.” It’s this internal drive that keeps him playing into his eighties, always challenging the complex but never quite satisfied with his ability to keep things simple.

And so Mr. Palmer’s lessons are simple, even though he knows that execution and accomplishment very often are not. Even the King himself is well aware of the limitations posed by golf’s complexity. “If you are caught on a golf course during a storm and are afraid of lightning,” Palmer once cracked, “hold up a one-iron. Not even God can hit a one-iron.”

This week I was working with an LPGA client and her sports psychologist. These “meetings of the minds” in the past, often became about me receiving a lecture about loading too many “swing thoughts” causing “analytical left brain” overload of the golfer. This session was refreshingly different as I was complimented by the good doctor for simplifying the mechanics. Our objective in this session was for the player and her coaches to be very specific about what her core fundamental feelings were and what drills would support this current development. In a short while, it became very apparent this man truly understood how to grow and prepare a high performance athlete for their best performance. He stated, “We are going to define your warm up routine as it doesn’t make sense for you to come out of the gate trying to create shots until you have warmed up with your core fundamentals.” Once you have gone through your core fundamental exercises, then and only then are you ready to begin shifting into your creative mind of executing specific shots as required for the course.” This philosophy and strategy will spare this player much frustration! Simplifying the Complex, the simpler the better!

Enjoy “Spring Training” with us in Orlando and get a huge jump start on a great summer of golf. Call direct, 407.996.3306, email, contact@bradbrewer.com or by cell after hours, 407.595.3645.
Until next time, happy golfing,

Lesson 13: Plan to Win! by Brad Brewer

February 20, 2014 5:50 pm

How much do you love the direction your game improvement is taking? If not, perhaps the inspiration you need is going to be gained in the next lesson I share with you from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer’s Success Lessons for Golf, Business and Life.

Lesson 13

Plan to Win

Augusta National is golf’s Garden of Eden, a stunningly beautiful slice of the American South. “If there’s a golf course in heaven,” Gary Player once remarked, “I hope it’s like Augusta National. I just don’t want an early tee time.”1

In Sync with His Plan to Win

With four wins at the Masters Tournament (1958, 1960, 1962, and 1964),3 Arnold Palmer has become synonymous with Augusta National. For Arnie, the place seemed to fit him like a glove—or a neatly trimmed blazer. Four green jackets, two runners-up, and fourteen top-ten finishes over a fifteen-year span made me believe Palmer was in some kind of spiritual harmony with Augusta National. I once asked him why he believed he was so successful on that course when it seemed to bring so many other gifted players to their knees.

“Well,” Arnold replied with a half-cocked smile, “of course, the Masters was the tournament I really wanted to win in my life. It was the people as much as it was the place itself that made Augusta National so special to me. People like Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts, who I became close to over the years, were an inspiration for me, not just for the golf, but for the way they conducted their lives and what they did in business too. I won the Masters in ’58, but in ’59 I should have won it, and I kind of let it slip a little bit. My win in 1960 was a major deal with good drama from my charging finish. Making birdies on the last two holes to win was sort of a reaction to previous situations that I was in. I just told myself that I wasn’t going to let what happened that last year happen again. It inspired me to go for it and I finished strong and won.”

His memories of nearly fifty years earlier still clear, he said, “My win in 1962 was a playoff and a squeeze down to the end. Then, of course, my mindset was that I had to win the Masters again, and I wanted to win one where I could walk up eighteen with the feeling of total enjoyment for having played in the tournament and having the things happen the way that I envisioned them to happen. I always wanted to have a good lead coming down the stretch with no doubt that victory was mine.”

“So did you ever accomplish that particular goal?” I asked.

“It did happen that way in ’62,” he said with a smile, “exactly how I had seen it happening in my mind. I stood on the seventy-second hole and said to my playing partner, Dave Marr, ‘I think I can win from here.’ It was not offered boastfully, but as someone who had really gotten to where they wanted to get to. Then Dave, who was a good friend, kidded me. ‘Make twelve!’ he said. By then I could smile, knowing that I wasn’t going to make twelve and that I was going to win the Masters. That victory in the very way I had envisioned it was a new and different personal satisfaction. It was something I’d been driving for in my life.”

Work Your Plan

“Plan your work and work your plan.” It sounds simple enough, doesn’t it? Catchy too. After studying Arnold Palmer’s career, I can say with assurance that the King has taken this philosophy to heart. But can the vast majority of golfers, mere amateurs, really believe that people can do what they desire, plan, and picture in their mind? The idea of “positive mental imaging” might not be a fail-safe exercise, but Palmer’s success and the success of countless others who employ the technique advocate it holds great promise.

Winning the Masters was a strong desire for Arnie, but it happened in large part because he planned out how he would win and then rehearsed his plan over and over again, like an actor memorizing a script. This same technique works outside of golf—perhaps even more effectively. It’s a wise person who plots a course of action before actually taking the plunge.

One of my favorite people was John Wooden, UCLA’s Hall of Fame basketball coach who died in June of 2010 at the age of ninety-nine. Coach Wooden was well-known as a planner who planned his work and worked his plan. He believed strongly in preparation because he felt it gave athletes the best chance of success. Coach Wooden, like Arnold Palmer, was also a stickler for not just doing ?but doing things well. He once remarked, “If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?” He also was a realist. “Things turn out best,” he said, “for those who make the best of the way things turn out.”

Certainly for Arnold Palmer, the difference between victory and defeat often came down to the time and effort he took plotting out a pretournament plan of action. Of all the things Arnold Palmer did on a consistent basis, he did one thing prior to every round of golf ?something all of us should do:

He planned to win!

Plan your next win. Begin by strategizing your actions to match your skills. If you are a natural fader of the golf ball, don’t go against the grain by forcing shots to the left pin positions or trying to curve the ball off the tee on a right-to- left dogleg hole. Choose your best angles and positions to match your strengths and then be disciplined enough to stick to the plan. The strength in the exercise comes from writing it out and then rehearsing it over and over again, until you know you are going to win and you know why you are going to win. That’s the Pro’s Secret, being a conscious competent that begins with thought moved through feeling into action creating the desired result.

Still not feeling the love? Call us today!  direct, 407.996.3306, email, contact@bradbrewer.com or by cell, 407.595.3645.

Until next time, happy golfing,


Lesson 5: Define Your Worthy Ideal by Brad Brewer

February 5, 2014 7:26 pm

How many of you have been unable to kick start your 2014 New Year Resolutions?  Or how many of you have already abandoned your great intentions to improve your health, wealth and GOLF?

Be kind to yourself and allow today to be your second chance!!

With the greatest desire to inspire you to a better you and your best golf in 2014, I share the following from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer Success Lessons for Golf Business and Life.

Lesson 5

Define Your Worthy Ideal

Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside of thema desire, a dream, a vision.

~Boxing legend Muhammad Ali

“Success is the progressive realization of a worthy ideal,” motivational speaker and author Earl Nightingale said, A “worthy ideal” is not just another great idea; it’s an idea that’s better than all the rest. It’s not just an idea that you like; it’s something you love. It’s the thing you would do anything to achieve, the thing you would give up almost everything else you possess in an effort to gain. The worthy ideal is also the thing you never give up pursuing regardless of how many times you fall down or fail trying.

The typical journey toward greatness is laced with heartache and hardship. If they do fall, winners get up, dust themselves off, and grow from the experience. Victors don’t lose the vision of the goal; the guiding vision is part of their heart and soul. Those most devoted to their worthy ideal would tell you they would rather fight to the death than consider giving up short of the finish line.

Inspired by his early string of successes, Arnold Palmer continued to steadily move closer to his worthy ideal of becoming the greatest golfer in the world. In some ways, this sounds obvious, but knowing where you want to end up before you embark on your journey is critical if you’re going to have any chance of getting there. You’d be surprised how many people forget how important it is to map out a deliberate and detailed strategy or even clearly state an objective. It’s become a bit of a cliché, quoted in music and recent films, but “if you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there.” It sounds good, but it’s just not so. Your destination will be determined by other forces. I’m more inclined to embrace the wisdom of Yogi Berra. “You’ve got to be very careful if you don’t know where you’re going,” he once mused, “because you might not get there.”

Set Your Sights

When your picture of success is fixed in your mind, it becomes like the North Star to the sailor, providing a constant bearing by which to guide your efforts. All too often we play it safe; we fail to fully commit to the direction of our worthy ideal. There could be several reasons for this, the most common one being our fear of failure. We often try to explain away our reluctance to take a chance by repeating some version of the following: “If I commit to my dreams and fall short, then I’ll be disappointedmaybe even devastated. I’ll be terribly embarrassed if anyone finds out how pathetic I really am. It’s better and safer to just wait and see what happens, and if I begin seeing that I could really do something, then I will reset my goals.”

Does thiswhich might qualify as the “Underachiever’s Creed”sound familiar? The problem with this “wait and see” approach is that all too often we give up at the first sign of difficulty or disappointment, and it’s impossible to benefit from the laws of momentum if you’re standing or sitting still.

If you’re really in love with an idea, you must do as Arnold Palmer did and commit yourself to making it happen. You have to live and breathe the dream. It sounds almost like a cliché, but it’s true: great discoveries come only when the captain of the ship is willing to lose sight of the shore. You often have to take a chance and assume the risks that accompany the adventure. Robert F. Kennedy, a U.S. senator, attorney general, and civil rights activist, said, “Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.”

You don’t need to have all the answers and you certainly don’t need to possess all of the resources in order to capture the vision of your worthy ideal. But the ascent and career of Arnold Palmer should remind us that catching a clear glimpse of your goal is the best and only way to give your dream a chance to come true.

So, how can declaring a worthy ideal affect your golf game? Fourteen months ago I began working with a young man, whom at the time had a USGA handicap of 12. This 20-year old told me that he desired to become a professional golfer. Today, Tony is a +3.2 handicap at Bay Hill Club his home course, and this past November turned pro. He has competed in five professional events so far, playing well enough to finish in the money twice. Certainly, he is an outlier, but without Tony declaring his worthy ideal raising his bar and focusing daily on his lofty goal he would not have accomplished such great strides. How about you? What lofty goals have you set for this new year? What is your worthy ideal, on and off the course, the thing that makes you stay up late and get up early?

Each month this year, the DailyBrew Blog will be sharing stories from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer’s Success Secrets for Golf, Business and Life. Each chosen story will deliver an inspirational message that if practiced like a pro, will allow a positive vibration and your greatest golf!

Until next time, happy golfing,


Lesson 5: Define Your Worthy Ideal by Brad Brewer

January 31, 2014 6:42 pm

How many of you have been unable to kick start your 2014 New Year Resolutions?  Or how many of you have already abandoned your great intentions to improve your health, wealth and GOLF?

Be kind to yourself and allow today to be your second chance:  the Chinese New Year ushering in the Year of the Horse which represents forward movement and stamina!

With the greatest desire to inspire you to a better you and your best golf in 2014, I share the following from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer Success Lessons for Golf Business and Life.

Lesson 5

Define Your Worthy Ideal

Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside of thema desire, a dream, a vision.

~Boxing legend Muhammad Ali

“Success is the progressive realization of a worthy ideal,” motivational speaker and author Earl Nightingale said, A “worthy ideal” is not just another great idea; it’s an idea that’s better than all the rest. It’s not just an idea that you like; it’s something you love. It’s the thing you would do anything to achieve, the thing you would give up almost everything else you possess in an effort to gain. The worthy ideal is also the thing you never give up pursuing regardless of how many times you fall down or fail trying.

The typical journey toward greatness is laced with heartache and hardship. If they do fall, winners get up, dust themselves off, and grow from the experience. Victors don’t lose the vision of the goal; the guiding vision is part of their heart and soul. Those most devoted to their worthy ideal would tell you they would rather fight to the death than consider giving up short of the finish line.

Inspired by his early string of successes, Arnold Palmer continued to steadily move closer to his worthy ideal of becoming the greatest golfer in the world. In some ways, this sounds obvious, but knowing where you want to end up before you embark on your journey is critical if you’re going to have any chance of getting there. You’d be surprised how many people forget how important it is to map out a deliberate and detailed strategy or even clearly state an objective. It’s become a bit of a cliché, quoted in music and recent films, but “if you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there.” It sounds good, but it’s just not so. Your destination will be determined by other forces. I’m more inclined to embrace the wisdom of Yogi Berra. “You’ve got to be very careful if you don’t know where you’re going,” he once mused, “because you might not get there.”

Set Your Sights

When your picture of success is fixed in your mind, it becomes like the North Star to the sailor, providing a constant bearing by which to guide your efforts. All too often we play it safe; we fail to fully commit to the direction of our worthy ideal. There could be several reasons for this, the most common one being our fear of failure. We often try to explain away our reluctance to take a chance by repeating some version of the following: “If I commit to my dreams and fall short, then I’ll be disappointedmaybe even devastated. I’ll be terribly embarrassed if anyone finds out how pathetic I really am. It’s better and safer to just wait and see what happens, and if I begin seeing that I could really do something, then I will reset my goals.”

Does thiswhich might qualify as the “Underachiever’s Creed”sound familiar? The problem with this “wait and see” approach is that all too often we give up at the first sign of difficulty or disappointment, and it’s impossible to benefit from the laws of momentum if you’re standing or sitting still.

If you’re really in love with an idea, you must do as Arnold Palmer did and commit yourself to making it happen. You have to live and breathe the dream. It sounds almost like a cliché, but it’s true: great discoveries come only when the captain of the ship is willing to lose sight of the shore. You often have to take a chance and assume the risks that accompany the adventure. Robert F. Kennedy, a U.S. senator, attorney general, and civil rights activist, said, “Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.”

You don’t need to have all the answers and you certainly don’t need to possess all of the resources in order to capture the vision of your worthy ideal. But the ascent and career of Arnold Palmer should remind us that catching a clear glimpse of your goal is the best and only way to give your dream a chance to come true.

 

So, how powerful can setting a worthy ideal become in your golf game? Fourteen months ago I had a young man of 20 years old, whom at the time had a USGA handicap of 12, tell me that he desired to become a professional golfer. Today Tony is a +3.2 handicap at his home course, Bay Hill Club and just this past November turned Professional and has competed in five professional events so far, playing well enough to finish in the money twice. Certainly, this is an outlier, but without Tony declaring his worthy ideal which raised his bar and focusing daily on his lofty goal he would not have accomplished such great strides. How about you? What lofty goals have you set in this new year? What is your worthy ideal, on and off the course, the thing that makes you stay up late and get up early?

Each month this year, the DailyBrew Blog will be sharing stories from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer’s Success Secrets for Golf, Business and Life. Each chosen story will deliver an inspirational message that if practiced like a pro, will allow a positive vibration and your greatest golf!

Until next time, happy golfing,


Lesson 22: Believe in Yourself by Brad Brewer

January 16, 2014 3:33 pm

“Your talent will not be lifted to the highest level unless you have belief.”
Leadership guru & bestselling author, John C. Maxwell

On behalf of the Brad Brewer Golf Academy in sunny Orlando, we trust you had a very happy holiday celebration, enjoying family and friends with good cheer and loving vibrations.

No matter what your religion, December is the season to celebrate belief. It is also a fabulous time to reflect upon the previous 11 months and all that was accomplished, and to begin thinking about the possibilities in 2014.

As a teacher and coach, I like to embrace this time of year to help my clients focus on goal setting and defining or reigniting their “why”. A “why” inspires action necessary to move closer to a desired goal. A “why” is what makes us dig deep when we feel like swapping time in the gym for a big mac and fries.

This is also when I evaluate my performance and identify areas of needed improvement and then jump on it, such as reading Jack Canfield’s book, Coaching for Breakthrough Success.

So what is the missing ingredient for goal attainment? Belief. The quote from John C. Maxwell of which I began this blog pretty much sums it up: Belief lifts your talent. Your talent will not be lifted to the highest level unless you also have belief.”

In Chapter 22 of Mentored by the King, I share a story about the power of belief, as my mentor Arnold Palmer schooled me on this subject and I shared how I applied his wisdom with a PGA Tour client who at the time was struggling to make a cut. With renewed belief he had a break-through season on the tour because the path to success is possible when talent is driven by a strong belief.

This is how I plan to help my clients to “bullet proof” their own belief:

1. Greatness is the new norm. Increase your belief by filling your mind with inspirational stories of the underdog who believed when nobody else would. There are hundreds if not thousands of movies, books and stories to digest and resonate with. Decide that you are going to be the next inspirational story.

2. Surround yourself with people who believe in your dreams and goals and genuinely support your commitment to greatness. Eliminate those who just don’t get it. You have the choice to outgrow them or allow them to pull you down. Your responsibility is to you and what you give energy to will grow. You will attract new people, those inspired by your commitment to excellence. The better you are, the better you can be to those you love.

3. Affirm your belief every day, “If it’s going to be it’s up to me”, and as Bob Proctor taught me, several times per day. Belief tools such as vision boards, worthy ideal cards and goals listed on your bathroom mirror are powerful. These tools shape your daily habits by aligning your desire with your belief.

4. Believe in your Path. What slows down our road to greatness is focusing too much on where we presently are instead of on our daily activity. The willingness to put it on the line, to struggle, is like rocket fuel for your journey to the top. One hour of struggle in competition is worth twenty hours of practice. The path to our goal is never a straight line but rather requires tracking back on course through current assessment and constant vision of the destination just like a rocket to the moon that is off course 97% of the time. A power thought for me is “SUCCESS is often buried under FRUSTRATION”. Keep believing that the GPS of the right path is guided by the vision of your worthy ideal. We don’t need to know all the steps necessary before we embark. It’s a progressive realization of your worthy ideal.

5. Believe in a power greater than yourself. It doesn’t matter what your choice of worship, successful people tap into the universal power through an attitude of gratitude. You are the creator of your own reality!

Each month in the new year, the DailyBrew Blog will be sharing stories from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer’s Success Secrets for Golf, Business and Life. Each chosen story is an inspirational message that when practiced like a pro, will allow a positive vibration and your greatest golf!

Until next time, happy holidays and happy golfing,

Shower Daily with Motivation by Brad Brewer

December 3, 2013 8:14 pm

“People often say that motivation doesn’t last.  Well, neither does a bath—that’s why we suggest it daily!” ~Zig Ziglar, 1926-2012 Author and Speaker

Do you feel like some days golf is endlessly complicated?  I often hear this statement from my clients; “I just lost my swing and I don’t know why…I had it yesterday!”  To this point, I want you to keep in mind that a golf swing is a conditioned habit just like riding a bike or speaking a second language.  If you truly “have” your golf swing, then it’s not going anywhere any time soon.  Possibly what did change is your ability to focus on what you want due to an overload of negative feelings and vibrations.  We are, I learned from mind guru Bob Proctor, vibrational beings and greatly influenced by the frequency of our vibratory rate.  Several things may cause undesirable feelings such as a confrontation with someone at home or at work, the traffic you encountered on the way to the course, and quite possibly, your allowing that last three-putt to get under your skin.  The fact is we are all faced with a myriad of unpleasant moments throughout the day that can cause a bit of stinkin’ thinking.

Shower daily with motivation is wonderful advice from the master motivator, Zig Ziglar.  The most mentally tough players are still greatly affected by what others say and do, what they read online, or hear on the radio or TV.  As Jeff Olson reminds us in his book,The Slight Edge, our environment is vastly polluted with negativity.  It’s extremely easy to get stinky and why we need to conduct a vibrational check up often.  Arnold Palmer advised, “Never go to dinner with a poor putter.”  Humorous as this may sound, great players don’t want to hear, “if only I could have putted well today I would have shot a 65” and all the other negative stuff that comes along with this attitude.  Golf, business or life, successful people surround themselves with like minded people.  They do this because they can feed off of the vibration of their optimism and become motivated from each other’s challenges and accomplishments.  Another way you wash away negativity, is to replace in your mind, what you would like to change about your day.

Bathing in motivation should become a daily habit like flossing your teeth.  It will influence your golf game more than having perfect technique.

Over the next twelve months, the DailyBrew Blog will be sharing with you stories from my book, Mentored by the King, Arnold Palmer’s Success Secrets for Golf, Business and Life.  Today’s blog is based upon Lesson 16:The Best Attract the Best. Each chosen story will provide a call to action that if practiced like a pro, will help you create your positive vibration followed by your best golf!

Change Your Self Image as a Golfer in 2013!

January 3, 2013 1:16 pm

Change Your Self Image as a Golfer in 2013!

Lessons, lessons, lessons…practice, practice, practice… It’s not only about lessons and practice or how much time is put into learning and rehearsing; it’s about first changing the self image in order to grow toward what you want for your game.

What image of a golfer are you declaring for yourself?

The Hacker:  I can’t hit it straight, far or sometimes even at all.  I’ve tried everything, including thousands of dollars on lessons and hundreds of hours of practice.  None of it has worked.  No matter what I do, I am still a Hacker!   Or do you call yourself “The Slicer” or do you declare you have “the yips” or always “three putt”?

These uttered confessions made in frustration are based entirely upon past errors.   When I begin to work with students new to the Academy they commonly share stories about apprehension of embarrassment during corporate outings, dreading the next posted score at their club events, and underlying anger after the first mishit shot that escalates hole after hole.  An abundance of talent cannot trump self defeating banter which undermines and destroys confidence leaving the plausible feeling of fear.

All I need is that missing tip or secret hand-shake that those playing pros on TV posses that I don’t.
Could there be secrets to playing this game with effortless power and precision?

I have the privilege of coaching high performance golfers.  Once these players embraced the power of self image, they advanced swiftly and with greater enjoyment.   Perusing my lesson journal, here are my top five best “secrets” you will want to incorporate into your winning thoughts, feelings and actions as you pursue your playing goals for 2013:

  1. Become aware of what you are saying about yourself, to yourself.  Get rid of any perception of you that is less than the excellent golfer you desire to be.  That old image is now outdated.  Keep your self-talk in check during practice, play and at the conclusion of each lesson to be sure it matches your new image.
  2. Choose a player you can model in order to get an image of what you want your golf swing to look like.  Study this swing in slow motion and at full speed on a daily basis to impress it upon your mind.  In front of a mirror, rehearse this swing in slow and even super slow motion.  Through repetition this image soon manifests into action.
  3. A shot is neither good nor bad unless you compare it to another shot.  Impressing bad memories into conditioned feelings will only get you more of what you don’t want.  Learn to celebrate the good shots and release the rest; for what you give energy to will grow.
  4. Our amazing bodies are governed by two frequencies:  Love or Fear.  It is not possible to play your best when you are fearful, and it is not possible to be afraid of making an error when you are in love with what you are doing.  This is also how my mentor Arnold Palmer claimed 63 PGA championships, by seizing the moments and playing fearlessly.
  5. Find the bright spots in playing the game.  Embrace the challenge that each and every shot and situation provides.  Enjoy the camaraderie of fellow playing partners.  Admire the beauty of a well-groomed course and all of nature’s gifts.

Setting goals in golf, business and in all aspects of life begins with an image of what you want.  As soon as you plant that new image of your golfing self in your mind, you are instantly moving in the direction of your goals and will soon be enjoying the journey towards better golf!

Happy golfing,

 

Could an annual eCoaching program be the right fit for you in 2013? Contact us today to schedule your call with Brad.    Direct, 407.996.3306 or email, contact@bradbrewer.com

Is there a Hybrid in Your Bag?

August 7, 2012 5:38 pm

Hybrids have become a staple replacement for the less forgiving long irons for Fred Couples and many of his fellow tournament champions. Even the purest of ball strikers on tour, including Couples finds that his TaylorMade Rescue 11 has improved his ability to hit a higher and more consistent approach, replacing his “butter knife” of a two iron.

Let’s take a closer look at the Rescue 11 that was in Freddie’s bag when he won the 2012 Senior Open at Turnberry. Technology Information provided by TaylorMade:

• Adjustable loft with Flight Control Technology (FCT)
• 4 degree face angle change, 2 degree loft change, 2 degree lie angle change, 1,000 RPM spin change
• Deeper face and lower Center of Gravity for easier launch
• White non-glare crown and black club face for easy alignment

I found this blurb online but unable to identify exactly who I can give credit to for this entertaining, albeit accurate review:

“Everything about the Rescue 11 hybrid screams ‘technology.’ The paint on the crown, the RIP shaft, and especially the adjustability factor. This factor, known as Flight Control Technology (FCT), is the soul of this club. With FCT you can increase or decrease the launch angle by 1 degree. There are eight, count them eight, different FCT positions that allow you to increase or decrease loft in .5 increments as well. Why should it’s big brother R11 driver have all the adjustable fun right? With every FCT adjustment your spin rate will also change as well. More loft gives you more spin for greater carry while the lower the loft the less spin you’ll get with a little less carry. In addition to the adjustability, TaylorMade also placed the CG (center of gravity) lower and more towards the rear of the club head which is designed for better shot shaping capability.”

So why are Hybrids easier to hit than traditional long irons? Because the lower the loft the more difficult it is to hit the ball high.

When you watch the Tour pros hit 2, 3, or 4-irons, you can see that these players have the swing skills to hit their conventional long irons almost as high as regular golfers hit their wedges. Average golfers cannot generate enough height with their long irons because, one, they have a much slower swing speed than the pros, and two, the swing skill necessary to be able to consistently hit down and through the ball while keeping their head behind the ball at impact with low-lofted irons is just not present.

Properly designed hybrid clubs that have the same loft as their long iron counterparts make it much easier to get the ball up in the air because hybrids are much “thicker” than conventional long irons.

This greater face-to-back dimension of the Hybrid long-iron replacement heads allows the center of gravity to be positioned much farther back from the face. This in turn results in a much higher trajectory for a shot off a hybrid club compared to a traditional long iron of the same loft. In other words, at equal lofts the hybrid with its center of gravity farther back from the clubface – will help the golfer get the ball up into the air on a higher trajectory than a long iron (whose center of gravity is much closer to the clubface). When you add loft to any shot you also increase precision. So, adding loft to the same degree of open or shut face creates a straighter ball flight.

These are the scientific reasons why Hybrids work better and are replacing the traditional long irons. Even to the point that the best players in the world are taking advantage of having a better performing club in the bag. If you haven’t already, consider taking one along for your next round!

Until next time, Happy Golfing!


Interested in being fit for game improvement equipment?

R11 Rescue by TayorMade

R11 Rescue Hybrid by TaylorMade

Contact us today to obtain your specs, receive club recommendations and if purchased through us, preferred pricing.

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